A Review - Strategy for Chaos: Revolutions in Military Affairs and the Evidence of History

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6-3-8.jpg

A Review - Strategy for Chaos: Revolutions in Military Affairs and the Evidence of History

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Author(s): David Goyne
No pages: 2
Year: 2003
Article ID: 6-3-8
Keywords: art of war, book review, network centric warfare
Format: Electronic (PDF)

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Abstract: Almost fifty years ago, Cyril Fall, an eminent military historian now much neglected, provided some sage and still timely advice in his review of the preceding century of military developments, when he wrote: 'Observers constantly describe the warfare of their own age as marking a revolutionary breach in the normal progress of methods of warfare. Their selection of their own age ought to put readers and listeners on their guard. Careful examination shows that, historically speaking, the transformations of war are not commonly violent. It is a fallacy, due to ignorance of technical and tactical military history, to suppose that methods of warfare have not made continuous and, on the whole, fairly even progress.' Colin S. Gray, the Professor of International Politics and Strategic Studies at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom, uses his latest book, Strategy for Chaos: Revolutions in Military Affairs and the Evidence of History, to examine the concept that successive 'Revolutions in Military Affairs' are the engine for the development of the theory and practice of war.