Design Issues and Results for High-Data-Rate Mobile Tactical Networks

13-2-4.jpg
13-2-4.jpg

Design Issues and Results for High-Data-Rate Mobile Tactical Networks

9.95

Author(s): Ian D. Holland
No pages: 5
Year: 2010
Article ID: 13-2-4
Keywords: command systems, communications systems
Format: Electronic (PDF)

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Abstract: The development of technologies that allow interoperable radios on a number of networked nodes for tactical scenarios has seen much interest in recent years. In particular, the Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) is one project aimed at designing interoperable tactical data links for a number of scenarios involving United States and coalition forces. The JTRS project was motivated by a number of factors concerning extant tactical data links. These factors include a lack of interoperability and the proprietary nature of the radios required, as well as the inability of such links to allow high-rate ad hoc networked communications in a highly mobile environment. It has been suggested that existing commercial off-the-shelf equipment could perhaps be used for tactical networking. Subsequently, in a previous paper by the author, preliminary results were presented for an example tactical networking scenario. In that paper, it was assumed that high-gain antennas could be used in such a way that they always provided maximum gain, irrespective of the locations of each node, and the types of antenna gain patterns that could be achieved with such antennas. Additionally, size, weight and power (SWAP) constraints were not considered. In this paper, SWAP constraints are considered in determining an example set of transmit power and antenna types to investigate the effects of such practical constraints on the data rates that could be achieved. Also, a single ground-reflector model is used for the wireless channel, instead of the line-of-sight only model assumed in the previous work. Results obtained by simulation of an adaptive orthogonal frequency division multiplexing scheme are provided for a range of possible asset separation distances. These results highlight both the effect of distance-dependent signal attenuation, and also antenna pointing mismatch. Such effects would need to be jointly considered when designing a high-rate tactical data network.