Blast Wave Transmission Through Transparent Armour Materials

15-2-3.jpg
15-2-3.jpg

Blast Wave Transmission Through Transparent Armour Materials

9.95

Author(s): Amy C. Courtney; Elijah D.S. Courtney; Michael W. Courtney
No pages: 4
Year: 2012
Article ID: 15-2-3
Keywords: blast mitigation, blast wave, firepower and protection, injury mitigation, transparent armor, transparent armour
Format: Electronic (PDF)

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Abstract: Face shields and goggles used by personnel at risk of exposure to explosions are designed to protect from projectiles. However, exposure to the primary blast wave itself can lead to eye and brain injuries, yet little is reported about the ability of transparent armor materials to attenuate a blast wave. In this study, a 79 mm diameter, oxy-acetylene driven shock tube was used to generate a blast-like wave with a peak pressure of 1173 kPa, and the pressure wave transmitted through six transparent armor materials was measured. With the exception of window glass (which shattered), the peak pressure was reduced by more than 20 dB by a 6.35 mm thickness of each material: cast acrylic, –22.63 dB; polycarbonate, –23.13 dB; tempered glass, –29.98 dB; laminated glass, –30.14; and aluminum oxynitride (ALON), –30.99 dB. The results show that different transparent armor materials have different abilities to attenuate a blast wave. Measurements like those in this study would be a useful part of design processes. Though ALON, a transparent ceramic, attenuated the blast wave the most, its current high cost may make tempered glass or laminated glass a better value for many applications, since they performed similarly.