Field Investigation and Modelling of Layered Aluminium Mesh for Blast Mitigation Purposes

15-2-1.jpg
15-2-1.jpg

Field Investigation and Modelling of Layered Aluminium Mesh for Blast Mitigation Purposes

9.95

Author(s): Joshua M. Hoffman; Braden T. Lusk; Kyle A. Perry
No pages: 9
Year: 2012
Article ID: 15-2-1
Keywords: aluminium mesh, AUTODYN, blast mitigation, firepower and protection, IED
Format: Electronic (PDF)

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Abstract: This paper introduces and describes field tests performed with aluminium mesh. The paper also describes a simple theoretical model created in ANSYS AUTODYN to predict the behaviour of the mesh. This is the third, and final, paper in a series which has characterized aluminium mesh and its blast mitigation properties. Despite its porous and lightweight characteristics, aluminium mesh has been found to have blast mitigation properties. The current use of the mesh includes fuel tanks for airplanes, boats, and fuel stations as well as light armoured vehicles for the military. The mesh acts as an explosion suppressant by preventing fuel tanks from exploding when exposed to an ignition source. More recently, work has been performed to assess the ability of the mesh to mitigate blast pressures produced by high explosives. Nearly 100 tests were conducted over a one-year time period using high explosives. The first series of tests was done in a small arena test format using two different charge sizes at two different scaled distances yielding four sets of data. All arena tests used four sensors with zero, five, ten, or 20 layers of mesh directly in front of the sensors. The second series of tests used a high explosive shock tunnel to replicate the waveform of a large explosive charge in open air at a prescribed scaled distance. Results from these test series can be found in the first two instalments of this series of papers. In May 2008, field tests were performed which applied the aluminium mesh to the undercarriage of a Humvee. These tests served as a proof of concept for application of the mesh in the field. One Humvee was outfitted with mesh while another Humvee acted as the control. Results are discussed. While the aluminium mesh is not ready for deployment in the experimental application method, field testing shows promise in the ability to mitigate IED explosion effects.