Reducing The Footprint of Deployed Information Systems With Cross Domain Solutions

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16-1-1.jpg

Reducing The Footprint of Deployed Information Systems With Cross Domain Solutions

9.95

Author(s): David Baker; Nihal Fernando; Ben Giesbertz; Frederic Lafon; Michael Liu; Arthur Ollett; Alex Parkinson; Scott Robertson
No pages: 6
Year: 2013
Article ID: 16-1-1
Keywords: CDS, command systems, Cross Domain Solution
Format: Electronic (PDF)

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Abstract: Deployed land operations across force, formation and unit node levels typically require information systems that support multiple security domains. Each domain requires its own servers, switching, cabling and user terminals. This infrastructure limits mobility and places significant demands on transportation, set-up time, engineering support and field power generation systems. Thales has successfully deployed the Cross Domain Solution (CDS), from Raytheon’s Trusted Computer Solutions, aboard Royal Australian Navy (RAN) platforms and we are currently developing it for the strategic environment under the Chief Information Officer Group’s (CIOG) Next Generation Desktop (NGD) program. The CDS enables user terminals to access multiple security domains across a single distribution network, improving user efficiency and significantly reducing the infrastructure footprint. This paper introduces CDS, explains how it works and provides supporting analysis of the logistical and other benefits from adopting a CDS – compared to existing deployed LAN architectures. It also describes how CDS can be used to provide efficient access for users within the constraints of vehicle mounted C4I solutions. The reduced footprint has many benefits. These include lower overall power consumption – which in turn equates to lower generator loads and fuel consumption, reduced time to deploy with fewer devices and less cable roll out and simplified introduction of new network services to deployed users as deployment scale changes. The key benefit for Defence is that a CDS will enable essential multi-domain information systems to be deployed in the land environment in a manageable, efficient and effective way.